The Red Thread of Destiny

We’ve all met someone who has been in our life before we actually met them.  People who have been at the same places at points in time as you have – but you don’t actually meet them until years later; friends we’ve made through seemingly random connections; being drawn to a person in a strange and exciting way.

Whether it’s meeting the love of your life because you were having the worst morning or chatting with a stranger and hearing something you just totally needed to hear that day.  A broken shoe, missing the bus, stuck in traffic… things that cause your normal hectic routine to force you to slow down an open a door for that person to enter – pushing you to be somewhere at a certain moment in time.  I believe that we have each have a destiny, a fate – but I believe there are many means in which to get there.  Many threads to follow, many paths to travel, and many choices made in arriving.

One old story featuring the red string of fate involves a young boy. Walking home one night, a young boy sees an old man (Yue Xia Lao) standing beneath the moonlight. The man explains to the boy that he is attached to his destined wife by a red thread. Yue Xia Lao shows the boy the young girl who is destined to be his wife. Being young and having no interest in having a wife, the young boy picks up a rock and throws it at the girl, running away. Many years later, when the boy has grown into a young man, his parents arrange a wedding for him. On the night of his wedding, his wife waits for him in their bedroom, with the traditional veil covering her face. Raising it, the man is delighted to find that his wife is one of the great beauties of his village, and he notices she wears an jewel on her eyebrow. Asking her why she wears it – she replies that when she was a young girl, a boy threw a rock and it struck her on the eyebrow and left a scar.  The woman is, in fact, the same young girl connected to the man by the red thread shown to him by the old man back in his childhood.  They were connected by the red string of fate.

In Japanese culture you find the same line of thinking except it is destined lovers tied around the pinky fingers by a red string.  Similar in thought to western views of “soul mates”, only the west doesn’t have the string in there, but same idea.  Destiny.  Fate.

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16 thoughts on “The Red Thread of Destiny

  1. Vidya SuryNo Gravatar

    I loved this story. I believe in destiny too. Which is probably why we feel that sense of “deja vu” over certain situations and when we meet certain people. I feel like I’ve known you all my life. I think we’re connected by that invisible red thread.

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    SheilaNo Gravatar Reply:

    @Vidya Sury,
    Yes, actually when I was writing this, I actually thought of you and Betsy and Jen! Thanks for coming by and have a great day today!

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  2. BetsyNo Gravatar

    Sheila,
    What a wonderful story. I, too, believe in fate and destiny. I have that knowing many times with people and then with some, you just don’t feel it. We just watched a movie called Sliding Doors with Gwyneth Paltrow that is all about the idea of missing the subway or catching it. It shows here two lives which ultimately end up the same. You may want to read it.

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    SheilaNo Gravatar Reply:

    @Betsy,
    Oooo that sounds like a great movie! And I know- I too agree, about having that “knowing” with some and not with others. There’s definitely levels of connection!
    Have a great day today Betsy!

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  3. DaisyDeadheadNo Gravatar

    This means enemies too, of course! I am currently wrestling with the Buddhist idea that our enemies are truly ‘our friends’ because they force us to deal with parts of ourselves we don’t like and must change.

    I am currently dealing with a “blast from the past” I could certainly do without, but trying hard to figure out the lesson that is in this for me. (sigh) I know this person has reappeared in my life for a reason, as much as I dislike thinking about that.

    Great post!

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    sheilaNo Gravatar Reply:

    @DaisyDeadhead,
    Yes, that is so true. My husband and I were just talking about this the other day. How difficult things and people happen or appear and in the end you can ususally find some lesson in it. Often times it takes a long time to figure that out, but when that light bulb goes off, it’ll make you smile. :)

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  4. BernadetteNo Gravatar

    Threads are everywhere. Just like the internet thread (link) that lead me here this morning. Some we notice. Some we don’t. Some are all but gone and others the angels throw out at in moment’s need. And I certainly have had some very special threads to consider through my life … For which I am grateful. Classrooms all! Great post, Sheila.

    [Reply]

    SheilaNo Gravatar Reply:

    @Bernadette,
    thank you I really appreciate your reading, commenting and sharing. That’s very nice of you :)

    Yes, they are everywhere!

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  5. Galen PearlNo Gravatar

    I had not heard this before, but as you say, the concept is familiar by other names. I went to an energy healer once who told me about how my adopted son came to be my son. The story involved past lives and the way we were connected to each other. Who knows if that was true, but I loved the idea that we were connected by that red thread through many lives.

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    SheilaNo Gravatar Reply:

    @Galen Pearl,
    Hmmmm I’d have to say to some extent I believe that VERY much (about your adopted son). I think we choose our parents… before birth… and that doesn’t necessarily mean who “birthed” us. :) I think that’s a cool thing, a cool message you received!!

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  6. Jannie FunsterNo Gravatar

    Boys used to throw rocks at me too. One in particular. They do that when they like you – it’s the Canadian way. :)

    Glad to hear his wife was one of his dreams. Usually those arranged marriages don’t go so well. :)

    xoxo

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  7. GailNo Gravatar

    I actually printed out a picture of “The Red String Of Fate” (and tied it with red thread) and gave it to my husband for our first anniversary. We first met in first grade, knew each other/shared classes all through school and dated for a time during our senior year. Unfortunately, we broke up after graduation and eventually married other people and had children. We thought we had gone our separate ways, but our lives paralleled each others for all those years. Our two older children are almost the same ages, we both moved away from our hometown to cities 30 miles away from each other, and we took our children to the same places (amusement parks, malls, etc.) We met up again years later at a reunion where the spark was ignited once more. We were married shortly after the reunion and we couldn’t be happier. He is my first and last love and I am so happy that we found each other again.

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    SheilaNo Gravatar Reply:

    @Gail,
    WOW! I adore stories like yours! Wonderful! I’m so happy for you :) Thanks so much for sharing :)

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    DreamerNo Gravatar Reply:

    @Gail,
    The so called “Red String of Fate” interests me that leads to reading different stories & quotes related to the same, hoping to find even a single post that would in a way answer questions regarding my current ordeal. Your story helped a lot… I don’t expect same positive ending as yours, but at least, gave some light to the cloudy thoughts. Thanks so much for posting… Best regards!:-)

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  8. JerryNo Gravatar

    I had an old classmate contact me after 23 years and we got to know each other again thru phone and texting for 3 months before we actually saw each other in person after I moved home. We then started to see each other on a regular basis since. My question is how do you know if theres a red string attached?

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    SheilaNo Gravatar Reply:

    @Jerry,
    I believe you just feel it. :) And I believe in your case, it is.

    [Reply]

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